12 Ways K-12 CIOs Use CloudReady

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12 Ways K-12 CIOs Use CloudReady

The world of operating systems is changing. 

Microsoft’s Windows has practically dominated the space since 1990, when Windows 3.0 came out. But now Google’s Chrome OS is upending the OS status quo. In just a few years, Chrome OS has gone from nonexistent to totally dominant in U.S. K-12 school districts, making up 70% of new computer shipments in 2018. Now, it is quickly making inroads with large enterprises, government agencies, and other organizations trying to attract and adapt to the next generation of graduates, save money, enhance security, simplify management, and increase reliability, without all of the traditional headaches. Chrome OS has already won early enterprise adopters shifting to the cloud (est. 5% U.S. market share in 2019), and now the early majority are beginning to pile in as the paradigm shifts from Windows and the OS status quo to Chrome OS and doing everything in the browser.

At Neverware, CIOs of school districts ranging from 100 to over 1,000,000 students come to us asking for help transitioning to the cloud - specifically OS help - and they usually have a specific problem they’re trying to solve. But what they come to realize is the paradigm shift with Chrome OS can address a LOT of other issues with their Windows/Mac computing - the cost of refreshing computers, the risk of ransomware attacks, the slow pace of wholesale migration to Chrome OS, the amount of time and effort IT spends supporting the OS status quo, and perhaps most importantly, the time students and teachers waste waiting through slow boot ups, battling through errors, and eye-rolling through lengthy, unexpected updates. Often, they don’t realize it’s an issue until they learn there’s something better.

A bit about our flagship solution: 

CloudReady is an operating system that transforms Windows and Mac computers up to 13 years old (no joke!) into Chromebooks. 

LI-CloudReady-machines.png

Neverware actually guarantees support for this HP Mini 100e model through mid-2023, believe it or not!

 
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And some of the newest ones look like this:

Newer computers that have been converted to Chromebooks using CloudReady

They then behave just like Chromebooks or Chromeboxes for students, teachers, and for IT admins. Students & teachers get faster boot times and better performance (imagine: no more disruptive Windows updates, no freezes/crashes, etc.), and IT eliminates a lot of inefficiencies tied to the OS status quo: 

  • Paying for new computers every 3-5 years

  • Pushing out Group Policy, updates, and security patches

  • Paying for and deploying antivirus and malware software

  • Dealing with endpoint security vendors

  • Handling TONS of helpdesk tickets

  • Reimaging computers

  • Oftentimes, paying to outsource some or all of these

  • Oftentimes, paying to cope with ransomware attacks

These are just a handful of items on the long list of IT responsibilities, though, and solving them can easily fall behind other priorities, especially when some IT admins, teachers, and staff don’t know these are solvable problems, having never worked with anything other than Windows or Mac OS! They don’t know what they don’t know. And those that “get it” might not know how to frame how big an impact Chrome OS/CloudReady can have for their CIO and school district as a whole. 

What would it mean to leave Windows - partially or completely?

After all, it is the OS that everyone has used for the last 25 years!

It takes an open mind and bold leadership from the CIO (and even the superintendent/board) to highlight these inefficiencies, prioritize technology, and tackle them head on - for the benefit of the IT team, students, teachers, and the district’s overall health. If you’re still new to Chromebooks or want some back story on how Google became dominant in K-12 the last few years, here are 4 reasons why Superintendents and CIOs have chosen Chromebooks

And here are 12 ways you can use CloudReady to your advantage as CIO:

1. Save or stretch your budget. 

As CIO, you are under pressure to perform and take on greater and greater responsibility. From digital transformation initiatives to cybersecurity programs, data privacy compliance and physical security, IT supports practically every new initiative in school district today, and it’s dizzying. A couple of CIOs I work with have inherited maintenance responsibilities in their buildings, or work under the policy that if it plugs into an OUTLET, or goes on the network at all, it falls under IT’s responsibility! 

While overall budgets may be increasing for select districts’ IT teams, most are getting squeezed. Even districts that are not actively trying to shrink overall IT costs are expecting investment into new initiatives that drive new student outcomes and therein curtailing legacy infrastructure budgets. CIOs are getting asked to do much more with less, and faster, while totally understaffed. Just ask Hal Friedlander, former CIO for the NYC Department of Education, overseeing IT for over 1.2 million students:

 
 

Or Jeffrey St. Aime, who operates all things Google & IT for Henry County Schools, with 40,000+ students and 40,000+ Chromebooks.

 
 


2. Eliminate end-user obstacles

with faster boot times, better browsing speed, and improved performance. End-users report a 94% decrease in PC downtime normally lost to helpdesk calls, reboots and OS maintenance. As CIO, you are responsible for ensuring the technological productivity of your organization. If students, teachers, and staff can work with greater speed and focus, everyone wins. Technology should get out of their way, never impede them.

 
 

3. Keep Windows 7 computers running, secure and supported after end-of-life (EOL) occurs on Jan 14th, 2020. 

As CIO, you can’t leave Windows 7 computers on Windows 7 - they’re a major security threat on your network and for your district. Upgrading to Windows 10 might be an option, but many Windows 7 computers will not run Windows 10 well, and they might not even fit it on their old, small drives! CloudReady offers you a secure, manageable, and reliable alternative to keep your Windows 7 computers in production for years longer. See how Questar Assessments - a company of 500 people that helps districts across the country with digital testing - does it.

4. Eliminate malware, ransomware and data privacy vulnerabilities. 

Chromebooks are secure by default and cannot launch malware or ransomware. In fact, they’re among the most secure computers out there. As CIO, your superintendent and board are increasingly counting on you to protect the organization from malicious actors and the front page of the newspaper. You can take a giant leap forward by securing your endpoints and student and teacher data with CloudReady.

5. Save your team time. 

IT teams that shift to Chromebooks experience a 78% average drop in helpdesk tickets & never have to update, secure, patch or deploy Group Policy again. As CIO, you then get to decide whether to reduce or repurpose your staff toward more impactful activities that support your teachers and students in new ways.

6. Centralize device management and standardize end-user computing on Chrome. 

As CIO, you want a central view into computers across your organization and control over how they’re used. Google’s Admin console and Chrome device management greatly simplify this for IT and make reporting a breeze.

And students and teachers get a simple interface they already know and love with the Chrome browser. There’s a minimal learning curve, and you can get everyone on the same platform quickly.

7. Increase the useful life of computers (up to 13 years). 

Windows and Mac computers are made to last 3-4 years and then often slow down dramatically. Along with updates come new bloatware (default apps you might not need, background services, etc.), and the cycle perpetuates. It’s a version of planned obsolescence, so that OEMs (Apple, Dell, Lenovo, HP, etc.), resellers, and other service providers stay happy selling new computers, accessories, and services. While some CIOs sweat these assets up to eight or even ten years in rare cases, performance for students and teachers suffers greatly with native OSs, and the computers fall out of compliance with the latest apps and digital testing requirements. 

Kirk Langer at Lincoln Public Schools, an A+ district in Nebraska with 40,000+ students, used CloudReady to extend the useful life of 4,000 Dell Latitude laptops, saving his team support hours in the process.

 
 

CloudReady is made to run on computers up to 13 years old. The OS is designed around efficiency, and modern Chromebook specifications (RAM, storage & processor capability) are remarkably similar to 10-year-old Windows & Mac computers. So the computers run great up until they hit the 13-year mark and even after, allowing CIOs to put off or eliminate costly replacements every 3-4 years. Think your CFO will like that?

8. Easily set up secure kiosks. 

Whether it’s for VDI (Citrix, VMware, Nutanix, etc.), digital signage, sign-in stations, or to lock down computers for high-stakes activities like K-12 state testing, CloudReady and Chromebooks are the easiest way to turn any computer into a secure kiosk

Henry County Schools uses CloudReady for Georgia Milestones Testing (42,000+ students), and CIOs from the largest districts in the country utilize CloudReady and Chromebooks at scale for state testing.

Note: CloudReady is used for state testing in all 50 states and across all major testing platforms (AIR, TestNav, DRC, NWEA, Questar, i-Ready, etc.).

9. Show financial prudence and accountability

to your board, superintendent, CFO, taxpayers, teachers, and parents. When was the last time you gifted them cost savings, productivity boosts, and happier teachers and students that they didn’t expect or realize were possible?

Ramona Loiselle, IT Director at Coronado Unified School District, with ~3,000 students, saved $180,000 with CloudReady and nailed CAASPP testing.

10. Increase good device access 

by getting more computers in student hands, including backups for when kids lose, damage, or leave their computers at home. CIOs know the pain of not having enough computers all too well. Getting 1:1 (one computer per student) is no longer ahead of the curve, it’s the expectationMinimizing the cost and sustaining 1:1 is another story though, and utilizing existing computers helps. CIOs can also turn old, slow, and obsolete computers into good computers that students and teachers want to use again, increasing good access, affordably, all while making it easy for their team. 

Dwayne Alton, Executive Director of IT Infrastructure Services for The School District of Lee County, with 90,000+ students, used CloudReady to increase access, save money and ease the transition from Windows to Chrome at scale.

 
 

11. Establish a long-term, sustainable computer refresh cycle. 

Has your district already budgeted for a refresh in four years, or will it be caught taking cookies from the CapEx cookie jar? As CIO, it makes life easier for everyone when you’ve formulated a long-term plan to keep your computers updated and determined the most appropriate budget well ahead of time. If you can’t quite get where you want today, CloudReady is a great option to bridge the gap. In some cases, CIOs have told us we were even their lifeline, enabling them to get the computers they needed just-in-time and just-within-budget, when they didn’t expect it to be possible.

12. Avoid Chromebook auto-update expiration (AUE). 

CloudReady computers never stop getting updates, and models are supported until 13 years after their release date. With regular Chromebooks, you have to budget for new ones every 5-6 years, at a maximum. 

With CloudReady, you gain the flexibility to sweat your assets as long as you want, and to avoid the effort and cost to actually do a replacement so often. Some CIOs are even buying new and refurbished Windows computers + CloudReady to avoid AUE.

What do you think? Will you swim with the rising tide, or sink with the OS status quo?

Have you checked what districts around you are doing? Have they already begun swimming, or maybe even raced ahead?

 

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Patch release for CloudReady v76.4 now available!

Patch release for CloudReady v76.4 now available!

 

Hey CloudReady Fans!

Tonight we’re releasing a patch to v76.4 to all channels and all Editions of CloudReady.

Devices will start receiving over-the-air updates for this release over the next few hours.

Patch Release Notes:

  • Fix for SD card readers not working on some devices: Some Lenovos, Acers, and HPs have issues with reading SD cards in v76.4, which is resolved in this release.

  • Fix for crashing caused by USB audio devices on some Dell Optiplexes: This issue caused repeated crashing and bootlooping for some Dell Optiplex models whenever connected to USB audio devices. The issue should be resolved and, after updating, USB audio devices should return to working reliably on all models.

  • Fix for wifi issues on Fujitsu Lifebook T734 after sleep: The Lifebook T734 required multiple retries to have working wifi on v76.4 after resuming from sleep. This patch resolves that problem as well.

For a review of the rest of CloudReady v76.4, please see the original release notes here.

Especially when it comes to bug-fix releases like this one, we are eager to hear from your organization if you continue to have any issues. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to our support desk if you have questions or concerns.

CloudReady v76.4 now available!

CloudReady v76.4 now available!

 

Hey CloudReady Fans!

We're excited to release v76.4 to all channels and all Editions of CloudReady today!

Devices will start receiving over-the-air updates for this release over the next few hours.

NOTE:
We shipped a patch-update for v76.4 on September 10th to resolve several new bugs that were discovered. See detailed release notes here.

Release Notes for v76:

  • OS and Browser Upgrade to 76

  • Fix for bug with Media Codecs that causes boot failure: In some rare cases, we’ve seen media codecs install improperly and ultimately cause a device to stop booting. We’ve added a fix to prevent this case.

  • Fix for issues on few USB printers: We found and fixed a bug that was causing a small subset of USB printers to fail to work on CloudReady.

  • MyFiles directory can now hold folders and files: Starting in v76, CloudReady supports the same new Files App behavior as Chrome OS where the MyFiles directory can contain new folder or store files.

  • Default camera app now pre-installed: The default Chrome OS camera app is now included in CloudReady just as on Chrome OS devices. (Note: Android-enabled Chromebooks may include an Android camera app which is different than the Chrome app included on CloudReady). ‘

  • Fix for display settings issues on some external monitors: In the last several releases, we’ve seen some models that, when connected to external monitors, look right but cannot have their settings adjusted and report inaccurate info in their display settings. This should be resolved, at least for an initial group of devices, in v76.3.

  • Support for Gemini Lake video playback: In earlier versions, Intel Gemini Lake devices had some issues playing back videos at medium or high resolutions. That problem is now resolved.

New in v76.4

  • Fix for screen rotation issues in tablet mode: We discovered and fixed an issue with screen rotation not being able to properly trigger once in tablet mode on some convertible CloudReady devices and tablets.

  • Fix for issues with new account creation at sign-in screen: In prior versions of v76, choosing to create a new Google account at the CloudReady sign-in screen would result in UI issues that caused difficulties completing the process. For the majority of devices. See below for a Known issue that persists with low-resolution displays.

New Certified Models in v76

  • AOpen DE3450

  • Apple iMac 12,1

  • Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1

  • HP Elitebook x360 1030 G2

  • Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 4th Gen


Known Issues

  • Intel G33 chipset displays black wallpaper after logging out: Older Intel desktops with G33 chipsets display wallpapers incorrectly after initial log in and log out takes place. This issue does not impact usability.

  • Issues with new account creation on low resolution screens: Though most devices work fine, CloudReady devices with resolutions below 1024x768 still have difficulties displaying the new account-creation UI at the sign-in screen.

  • Issues with external display on some Nvidia 9400/m GPUs: We’ve seen a number of Macs with Nvidia 9400 or 9400m GPUs that show problematic graphics tearing or even, rarely, crashing, when attached to an external display whose resolution exceeds the Mac’s internal one. Reducing the resolution on external displays can work around this issue while we investigate a fix.

CloudReady v76.4 (early release) now available for 64-bit Home Edition!

CloudReady v76.4 (early release) now available for 64-bit Home Edition!

 

Hey CloudReady Fans!

Thanks to feedback from our users, we learned about a couple issues in v76.3. Though the issues were not on certified devices, we wanted to resolve the issue to avoid any loss of compatibility, so today we’re bringing that fix to all release channels for the 64bit version of CloudReady Home Edition in an early release of 76.4!

Along with the fix for 32bit EFI bootloaders which we wanted to fix, there are a few new changes compared to 76.3 that are noted below. We expect to bring a couple additional change in an wider release of 76.4 to all Editions and channels in the coming days.

This release is available as an OtA update starting now, as well as for fresh USB installs.

Release Notes for v76:

  • OS and Browser Upgrade to 76

  • Fix for bug with Media Codecs that causes boot failure: In some rare cases, we’ve seen media codecs install improperly and ultimately cause a device to stop booting. We’ve added a fix to prevent this case.

  • Fix for issues on few USB printers: We found and fixed a bug that was causing a small subset of USB printers to fail to work on CloudReady.

  • MyFiles directory can now hold folders and files: Starting in v76, CloudReady supports the same new Files App behavior as Chrome OS where the MyFiles directory can contain new folder or store files.

  • Default camera app now pre-installed: The default Chrome OS camera app is now included in CloudReady just as on Chrome OS devices. (Note: Android-enabled Chromebooks may include an Android camera app which is different than the Chrome app included on CloudReady). ‘

  • Fix for display settings issues on some external monitors: In the last several releases, we’ve seen some models that, when connected to external monitors, look right but cannot have their settings adjusted and report inaccurate info in their display settings. This should be resolved, at least for an initial group of devices, in v76.3.

New in v76.4

  • Fix for boot issues on some Intel Bay/Cherry Trail devices - Devices with these generations of hardware were sometimes built with 32bit EFI bootloaders. Those had a bug which stopped them from booting v76, but we’ve now resolved that.

  • Fix for Intel Gemini Lake video playback issues in v76.3

Known Issues

  • Intel G33 chipset displays black wallpaper after logging out - Older Intel desktops with G33 chipsets display wallpapers incorrectly after initial log in and log out takes place. This issue does not impact usability.

  • Issues confirming new user creation at sign-in screen - On v76, CloudReady may have display issues that make it difficult to create a new “@gmail.com” user from the sign-in screen. Existing Gmail or GSuite accounts should have no issues. For a workaround to this issue, see this Community post.

CloudReady v76.3 now available!

CloudReady v76.3 now available!

 

Hey CloudReady Fans!

Today we’re releasing v76.3 today to all release channels for the Home Edition, and to the Dev and Beta Channels for Education and Enterprise Edition.

Devices on those channels can expect over-the-air updates for this release over the next few hours. (Education and Enterprise devices will need to subscribe to the Dev or Beta Channel if they are not already on it.)

Home Edition users can also create a USB installer for this new version.

Release Notes for v76:

  • OS and Browser Upgrade to 76

  • Fix for bug with Media Codecs that causes boot failure: In some rare cases, we’ve seen media codecs install improperly and ultimately cause a device to stop booting. We’ve added a fix to prevent this case.

  • Fix for issues on few USB printers: We found and fixed a bug that was causing a small subset of USB printers to fail to work on CloudReady.

  • MyFiles directory can now hold folders and files: Starting in v76, CloudReady supports the same new Files App behavior as Chrome OS where the MyFiles directory can contain new folder or store files.

  • Default camera app now pre-installed: The default Chrome OS camera app is now included in CloudReady just as on Chrome OS devices. (Note: Android-enabled Chromebooks may include an Android camera app which is different than the Chrome app included on CloudReady).

New in v76.3

  • Fix for display settings issues on some external monitors: In the last several releases, we’ve seen some models that, when connected to external monitors, look right but cannot have their settings adjusted and report inaccurate info in their display settings. This should be resolved, at least for an initial group of devices, in v76.3.

  • Fix for DisplayLink 2.0 issues in earlier versions of v76

  • Fix for Optimus graphics issues in earlier versions of v76

  • Fix for green screen when Chromecasting from some Intel device in earlier versions of v76

  • Fix for sound output failures in earlier versions of v76

Known Issues

  • Intel G33 chipset displays black wallpaper after logging out - Older Intel desktops with G33 chipsets display wallpapers incorrectly after initial log in and log out takes place. This issue does not impact usability.

  • Intel Gemini Lake graphics video playback issues - Devices with Gemini Lake graphics seem to have problems in v76.3 playing back video depending on the situation and type of video. We’re investigating this issue and hope to fix it in an upcoming release.

  • Intel Cherry Trail boot and Bay Trail issues - Devices with Intel Cherry Trail and Bay Trail chipsets that were previously able to boot CloudReady v74 may boot to a black screen after update to v76, and will not USB boot/install. We are actively investigating and collecting info about this issue. Please visit this thread in our Home Edition forums to report your issue and for help reinstalling v74.

CloudReady v76.2 now available!

CloudReady v76.2 now available!

Hey CloudReady Fans!

v76.2 is releasing today to the Dev Channels for Education and Enterprise Edition customers and the Beta Channel for the Home Edition.

Devices on those channels can expect over-the-air updates sometime today.

If you’re interested in previewing this release, subscribe to the Dev or Beta Channel to get an over-the-air update now.

Release Notes for v76:

  • OS Upgrade to 76

  • Fix for bug with Media Codecs that causes boot failure: In some rare cases, we’ve seen media codecs install improperly and ultimately cause a device to stop booting. We’ve added a fix to prevent this case.

  • Fix for issues on few USB printers: We found and fixed a bug that was causing a small subset of USB printers to fail to work on CloudReady.

  • MyFiles directory can now hold folders and files: Starting in v76, CloudReady supports the same new Files App behavior as Chrome OS where the MyFiles directory can contain new folder or store files.

New in v76.2

  • Sleep resume fixes: Some changes and revisions to sleep/resume behavior on a few desktops are included in this release, including the HP Compaq dc5850, Dell Optiplex 360, and Dell Optiplex 960.

  • Default camera app now pre-installed: The default Chrome OS camera app is now included in CloudReady just as on Chrome OS devices. (Note: Android-enabled Chromebooks may include an Android camera app which is different than the Chrome app included on CloudReady).

  • Fix for session-restore issues from 76.1: An issue in v76.1 that caused sessions to not restore properly has been resolved.

New in July 26th Patch

We’ve shipped an update to 76.2 as of July 26th with the following improvements and changes

  • HDMI audio fixes: Some devices were failing, partially or wholly, to send audio over HDMI in earlier versions, but this has been corrected.

  • Fix for crashing when sending install logs: We’ve fixed an issue where Enterprise and Education devices were exhibiting crashes when sending install logs.

  • Fix for video decoding issues on Coffee and Kaby Lake intel devices

  • Fix for several Nvidia issues introduced in v76.1

  • Fix for issues waking Dell desktops from sleep via mouse or keyboard

  • Fix for VPNs that were not working on some devices in v76

  • Fix for Bluetooth failures on older devices introduced in v75.1

Known Issues

  • DisplayLink 2.0 devices sometimes crash when attaching: Though not every time, docks and peripherals that output video over USB 3 via the DisplayLink protocol are crashing when attached. We are investigating this issue.

  • Enabling Optimus or AMD Switchable graphics causes crashing: A previously fixed issue has re-emerged where devices set to dynamically switch between integrated Intel graphics and discrete GPUs will crash. To avoid this issue, disable “Optimus” or “Switchable” graphics in your BIOS, or explicitly set your graphics to use Intel GPU.

  • Some older Intel machines show a green screen when trying to Chromecast: A number of older Intel chipsets are failing to display when casting - we’re working on a fix for this in v76.3.

  • Sound output fails after resuming from sleep: For a variety of different models, we’ve found sound output stops working after a sleep/resume cycle. Rebooting fixes the issue and can be used as a temporary workaround.

Unstable releases often have unforeseen bugs. We rely upon Dev Channel users to report those to us in our forums. If you're ok with a little instability, please jump to this new release and let us know what you think and report any issues using the links below.

Announcement: End of Support for CloudReady Home Edition 32bit

Announcement: End of Support for CloudReady Home Edition 32bit

Today we're announcing the end-of-support timeline for 32bit images of CloudReady: Home Edition.

Around 7 months ago, we announced new policies around device support, including the fact that Education and Enterprise Editions of CloudReady would stop providing 32bit images in August of 2019. Since that time, we’ve reviewed 32bit images, their challenges, and the time investment it requires of us, with the aim of clarifying the outlook for the 32bit images on the Home Edition as well.

In the end, it was clear that now is the right time to be retiring 32bit images for all of CloudReady.

Starting at the end of August 2019, the Home, Education, and Enterprise Editions of CloudReady will stop builds, releases, and updates for 32bit images.

Reasons for This Change

As we described in our January announcement, the Chromium and Linux communities are shifting support away from 32bit support, which leads to more and more gaps where the latest security and feature updates are unsupported, unavailable, or broken on 32bit builds.

Our core commitment with CloudReady is to provide a secure and reliable OS, and we don’t feel we can deliver on that promise on all future 32bit builds.

What to Expect Next

CloudReady v76.4 will arrive in late August this summer. That release will include 32bit builds for Education, Enterprise, and Home Editions. For all releases following that, Neverware will stop building 32bit CloudReady and will not ship updates or provide support to existing devices running 32bit images.

32bit-only devices will be able to continue running v76.4. That release may work for a few months, or for much longer, but we won’t be able to guarantee functionality, in whole or part, on those devices after that point.

64bit-capable devices that are installed with 32bit images will stop getting updates, but can be reinstalled with 64bit images. Since v64, CloudReady has provided notifications to these devices to make users aware that their device is capable, so you can check for those after each update to determine if your device should be reinstalled.


It is never our preference to limit support or prevent use on specific hardware. Nevertheless, our team is confident that this change is in the best interest of CloudReady’s long-term success, and we hope this information will help explain why.

We value every user of CloudReady and hope all of you will continue to support Neverware by running CloudReady on your devices.

 
Forrest Smith

About Forrest

Forrest Smith is Neverware's Director of Product & CX. A native of the Buffalo, NY, area, Forrest came to Neverware as a sales intern and never left. He runs on coffee, PB toast, and dollar pizza slices.

View all posts by Forrest.

 

CloudReady v76.1 now available!

CloudReady v76.1 now available!

 

Hey CloudReady Fans!

We're announcing the initial release of v76.1 to the Dev Channel for CloudReady: Home Edition today. For this release, we are publishing only the 64bit build and will follow with 32bit builds and a release for Education and Enterprise Editions soon with v76.2.

64bit devices on the Dev Channel can expect over-the-air updates for this release over the next few hours.

If you’re interested in previewing this release, subscribe to the Dev Channel to get an over-the-air update now.

Release Notes for v76:

  • OS Upgrade to 76

  • Fix for bug with Media Codecs that causes boot to fail: In some rare cases, we’ve seen media codecs install improperly and ultimately cause a device to stop booting. We’ve added a fix to prevent this case.

  • Fix for issues on few USB printers: We found and fixed a bug that was causing a small subset of USB printers to fail to work on CloudReady.

  • MyFiles directory can now hold folders and files: In v74 we disabled new functionality to store files and folders in the MyFiles directory of the local Files App in order to prevent a bug with Downloads folders disappearing for older installs. Working with the upstream Chromium OS team, we’ve resolved this issue and now support the same Files App behavior as Chrome OS.

Known Issues

  • Video decoding issues for Coffee Lake, Kaby Lake, and other devices: We’re seeing video stream corruption for certain sources, including VP9, on several modern Intel GPUs. We expect to resolve this in v76.2.

  • User sessions repeatedly prompt to “Restore”: Some users and devices on v76.1 are failing to recover their tabs and state after a graceful log out or shut down, and instead prompt you to “Restore” after logging in every time. If you click “Restore”, this should not impact usability.

Unstable releases often have unforeseen bugs. We rely upon Dev Channel users to report those to us in our forums. If you're ok with a little instability, please jump to this new release and let us know what you think and report any issues using the links below.